Iago ́s Iniquitous Cajolery of the Suspicious Othello

Book Review: Iago ́s Iniquitous Cajolery of the Suspicious Othello

As I delved into the pages of Oliver Baum’s “Iago’s Iniquitous Cajolery of the Suspicious Othello,” I was immediately transported to the world of Shakespeare’s famous play. From the very first page, Baum’s analysis of the characters and events had me hooked.

One thing that really stood out to me was Baum’s deep understanding of Iago’s character. He expertly broke down every action and motivation, illuminating just how insidious and cunning this villain truly is. As a reader, it was fascinating to watch him manipulate those around him, all while hiding behind a facade of loyalty and trust.

But what really struck me about this book was how it made me see Othello in a whole new light. Through Baum’s careful analysis, I began to understand just how susceptible Othello is to manipulation – and how much of his downfall can be attributed to his own flaws and weaknesses.

Of course, no book is without its flaws. At times, Baum’s writing can be overly academic or dense, which may put off some readers who are looking for a more accessible read. Additionally, the brevity of the book (28 pages) means that some topics aren’t explored as deeply as they could be.

But these minor critiques aside, “Iago’s Iniquitous Cajolery” is a must-read for anyone who loves Shakespeare or wants to delve deeper into this iconic play. It will make you think critically about each character and their motivations – and ultimately leave you with a newfound appreciation for one of literature’s most complex tales.

See also  Psychology of Disability

Iago ́s Iniquitous Cajolery of the Suspicious Othello

Iago ́s Iniquitous Cajolery of the Suspicious Othello

publishedDate : 2009-02

authors : Oliver Baum

publishers : GRIN Verlag

pageCount : 28

Article Related to “Iago ́s Iniquitous Cajolery of the Suspicious Othello” Book :

Iago ́s Iniquitous Cajolery of the Suspicious Othello – Books

Critics characterise Othello as not smoothly jealous, inherently jealous, and too eagerly beguiled 1 For so that he becomes fervently resentful (cf. Davison 13). While Davison regards jealousy as a calamitous vigour in Othello , Mason grants the mastery of maleficence.11 I will verify my thesis that the envious Iago causes Othello’s jealousy …

Iago ́s Iniquitous Cajolery of the Suspicious Othello

Critics characterise Othello as not smoothly jealous, inherently jealous, and too eagerly beguiled 1 For so that he becomes fervently resentful (cf. Davison 13). While Davison regards jealousy as a calamitous vigour in Othello , Mason grants the mastery of maleficence.11 I will verify my thesis that the envious Iago causes Othello’s jealousy …

Iago S Iniquitous Cajolery Of The Suspicious Othello


Iago S Iniquitous Cajolery Of The Suspicious Othello

Author by : Oliver Baum
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 2009-02
Publisher by : GRIN Verlag

ISBN :

Description : Seminar paper from the year 2007 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,0, University of Marburg (Institut für Anglistik und Amerikanistik, FB 10), course: Preparatory Seminar to the Shakespeare Excursion to London, 38 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: This paper expatiates on the topic of jealousy and revenge as it emanates from the play. Lily B. Campbell labels Othello "A Tragedy of Jealousy".9 Certainly, for most recipients, Othello is about jealousy and, thus, "shocking, even horrible".10 Harold Bloom announces that Othello's "name in effect becomes jealousy" (Fernie 19). Critics characterise Othello as not smoothly jealous, inherently jealous, and too eagerly beguiled 1 For so that he becomes fervently resentful (cf. Davison 13). While Davison regards jealousy as a calamitous vigour in Othello, Mason grants the mastery of maleficence.11 I will verify my thesis that the envious Iago causes Othello's jealousy which culminates in frantic reprisal. Hence, I retain that Iago's malice and fake honesty annihilate Othello's bond. To fathom the tragedy of Othello, it is indispensable to specify the cognitive theory of jealousy and envy which eventuates from psychology's interest in anthropoid liaisons, and is primordial and reiterative in literature. Tales of cruel jealousy appealed to Elizabethans on account of the notion that women are impious and that the husband's reputation is contingent on his wife's celibacy. Shakespeare's interest in jealousy stems from Elizabeth Cary's (c. 1585-1639) closet drama Mariam (1603/1613). Traditionally, jealousy supervenes in comedy and is linked to sexual possessiveness.12 The theory of humours13 defines jealousy as "a species of envy, which is in turn a species of hatred" (Honigmann 33). Although jealousy has come to be used frequently for envy, both terms should be separated. While jealousy connotes what you own and do not fancy to be deprived of, envy is what you woul...






Iago S Iniquitous Cajolery Of The Suspicious Othello


Iago S Iniquitous Cajolery Of The Suspicious Othello

Author by : Oliver Baum
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 2009-02-25
Publisher by : GRIN Verlag

ISBN :

Description : Seminar paper from the year 2007 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,0, University of Marburg (Institut für Anglistik und Amerikanistik, FB 10), course: Preparatory Seminar to the Shakespeare Excursion to London, 38 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: This paper expatiates on the topic of jealousy and revenge as it emanates from the play. Lily B. Campbell labels Othello “A Tragedy of Jealousy”.9 Certainly, for most recipients, Othello is about jealousy and, thus, “shocking, even horrible”.10 Harold Bloom announces that Othello’s “name in effect becomes jealousy” (Fernie 19). Critics characterise Othello as not smoothly jealous, inherently jealous, and too eagerly beguiled 1 For so that he becomes fervently resentful (cf. Davison 13). While Davison regards jealousy as a calamitous vigour in Othello, Mason grants the mastery of maleficence.11 I will verify my thesis that the envious Iago causes Othello’s jealousy which culminates in frantic reprisal. Hence, I retain that Iago’s malice and fake honesty annihilate Othello’s bond. To fathom the tragedy of Othello, it is indispensable to specify the cognitive theory of jealousy and envy which eventuates from psychology’s interest in anthropoid liaisons, and is primordial and reiterative in literature. Tales of cruel jealousy appealed to Elizabethans on account of the notion that women are impious and that the husband’s reputation is contingent on his wife’s celibacy. Shakespeare’s interest in jealousy stems from Elizabeth Cary’s (c. 1585-1639) closet drama Mariam (1603/1613). Traditionally, jealousy supervenes in comedy and is linked to sexual possessiveness.12 The theory of humours13 defines jealousy as “a species of envy, which is in turn a species of hatred” (Honigmann 33). Although jealousy has come to be used frequently for envy, both terms should be separated. While jealousy connotes what you own and do not fancy to be deprived of, envy is what you would like to retain but do not have. Spinoza specifies jealousy as “the hatred towards an object loved [...] with the envy of another”.14 In 2.1., I will discuss Othello as domestic and revenge tragedy. For Stanley Wells explains that Shakespeare fosters “the emotional response of his audiences”,15 in 2.2., I will convey Othello’s origin within Elizabethan theatre. In 3.1. and 3.2., I will scrutinize Iago’s vice tradition and motivation. This is vital for the temptation scene which I will analyse, in 3.3. For “the study and the stage” are “often separate” (Matteo 1), I will include the stage. In 4., I will reflect my results....






Othello


Othello

Author by : William Shakespeare
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 2014-07-26
Publisher by : CreateSpace

ISBN :

Description : The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in approximately 1603, and based on the Italian short story Un Capitano Moro ("A Moorish Captain") by Cinthio, a disciple of Boccaccio, first published in 1565. The work revolves around four central characters: Othello, a Moorish general in the Venetian army; his new wife, Desdemona; his lieutenant, Cassio; and his trusted ensign, Iago. Because of its varied and current themes of racism, love, jealousy and betrayal, Othello is still often performed in professional and community theatres alike and has been the basis for numerous operatic, film and literary adaptations.The play opens with Roderigo, a rich and dissolute gentleman, complaining to Iago, an ensign, that Iago has not told him about the secret marriage between Desdemona, the daughter of a Senator named Brabantio, and Othello, a Moorish general in the Venetian army. He is upset by this development because he loves Desdemona and had previously asked her father for her hand in marriage. Iago hates Othello for promoting a younger man named Michael Cassio above him, and tells Roderigo that he plans to use Othello for his own advantage. Iago is also angry because he believes, or at least gives the pretence of belief, that Othello slept with his wife Emilia. Iago denounces Cassio as a scholarly tactician with no real battle experience; in contrast, Iago is a battle-tested soldier. By emphasizing Roderigo's failed bid for Desdemona, and his own dissatisfaction with serving under Othello, Iago convinces Roderigo to wake Brabantio, Desdemona's father, and tell him about his daughter's elopement. Iago sneaks away to find Othello and warns him that Brabantio is coming for him.Before Brabantio reaches Othello, news arrives in Venice that the Turks are going to attack Cyprus; therefore Othello is summoned to advise the senators. Brabantio arrives and accuses Othello of seducing Desdemona by witchcraft, but Othello defends himself successfully before an assembly that includes the Duke of Venice, Brabantio's kinsmen Lodovico and Gratiano, and various senators. He explains that Desdemona became enamored of him for the sad and compelling stories he told of his life before Venice, not because of any witchcraft. The senate is satisfied, but Brabantio leaves saying that Desdemona will betray Othello. By order of the Duke, Othello leaves Venice to command the Venetian armies against invading Turks on the island of Cyprus, accompanied by his new wife, his new lieutenant Cassio, his ensign Iago, and Iago's wife, Emilia as Desdemona's attendant.The party arrives in Cyprus to find that a storm has destroyed the Turkish fleet. Othello orders a general celebration and leaves to spend private time with Desdemona. In his absence, Iago schemes to get Cassio drunk after Cassio's own admission that he cannot hold his wine. He then persuades Roderigo to draw Cassio into a fight. The resulting brawl alarms the citizenry, and Othello is forced to quell the disturbance. Othello blames Cassio for the disturbance and strips him of his rank. Cassio is distraught, but, as part of his plan to convince Othello that Cassio and Desdemona are having an affair, Iago persuades Cassio to importune Desdemona to act as an intermediary between himself and Othello, in order to convince her husband to reinstate him.Iago now persuades Othello to be suspicious of Cassio and Desdemona. Othello drops a handkerchief (with which Desdemona was trying to bind his headache) that was Othello's first gift to Desdemona and which he has stated holds great significance to him in the context of their relationship. Despite the supposed importance of the handkerchief neither seem to notice the handkerchief had been dropped. Emilia finds it, and gives it to Iago, at his request, but she is unaware of what he plans to do with the handkerchief. Iago plants it in Cassio's lodgings as evidence of Cassio and Desdemona's affair....






The Beast With Two Backs Race And Racism In Shakespeare S Othello


 The Beast With Two Backs Race And Racism In Shakespeare S Othello

Author by : Ann-Kathrin Latter
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 2017-03-08
Publisher by : GRIN Verlag

ISBN :

Description : Seminar paper from the year 2015 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,0, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, language: English, abstract: This term paper seeks to dislocate traces of racism within the characters of Iago, Othello, and Desdemona in Shakespeare's "Othello". By scrutinizing both overt and covert forms of xenophobia, it tries to explain how and why the play came to its tragic ending. In 1994, Nelson Mandela wrote in his autobiography that "no one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin, or his background, or his religion" and that, consequently, "people must learn to hate". By itself, this is a simple statement but it is also egregious in the way it makes us understand. There is nothing it could not explain, no dispute it could not illuminate. And even though Mr. Mandela had originally formulated his statement with regard to Apartheid, it fits extraordinarily well to racism in Shakespeare’s "Othello". Judging from Michael Neill’s investigations into the subject of notions of human difference in early modern societies, 16th century Venice had a considerably open attitude towards foreigners of any kind, with a great deal of cultural exchange taking place between people of every colour and every religion. By the beginning of the 17th century, however, this started to change: as the number of encounters with foreign cultures increased, "color emerg[ed] as the most important criterion for defining otherness" (Neill). As Mandela would have put it, Venetians started to learn hating others in behalf of their skin colour. And precisely this kind of development is illustrated in Othello: the Moor, who is actually a prime example for successful integration, has to endure an increasing degree of enmities and discriminations as racist sentiments begin to emerge in Venetian society — sentiments even Othello himself cannot resist....






Multiple Iago The Character And Motives Of Iago In Shakespeare S Othello


Multiple Iago The Character And Motives Of Iago In Shakespeare S Othello

Author by : Pia Witzel
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 2008-09
Publisher by : GRIN Verlag

ISBN :

Description : Seminar paper from the year 1999 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, University of Dusseldorf "Heinrich Heine" (Anglistisches Institut), course: Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet and Othello, the Moor of Venice, 16 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Introduction There has been a long critical debate about the figure of Iago in Shakespeare s Othello and especially about his motivation. Most complex of all for actors and critics is the Iago problem. This villain is much more dangerous than Cinthio s. He not only betrays the Moor and the Captain (Cassio); he injures everyone in his vicinity. How can so evil a man be plausible? How can he win the confidence of so apparently noble a man as Othello? And more important, what is his motivation? Why should any man hurt others so much? Is he simply a dramatic mechanism? A symbol of the devil? The devil himself? Or is he in fact a good man who has been provoked to revenge by wrongs done him? Was he unfairly denied promotion by Othello? Cuckolded by him? By Cassio? Finally, how can a character who does so much wrong involve audiences so deeply in his fate? The controversy has produced many different views and, rereading them, one could get the impression that Iago has become a real person with real traits of character and that he is responsible for what he has "done", and some critics withdraw more and more from the original text. Therefore any consideration of Iago s or any other character refers to his "character" as a stage personage in Shakespeare s Othello. After seeing the bulk of literature written on the character of Iago, one tends to agree with Adamson: So many critics over the years have made so much sense (not to mention nonsense) of Iago that one naturally hesitates to dig over the plot again. Criticism on Othello is very diverse. Following are a few examples of the manifold interpretations of Iago s character....






Race And Religion In Othello


Race And Religion In Othello

Author by : Nadja Niyaz
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 2017-06-27
Publisher by : GRIN Verlag

ISBN :

Description : Seminar paper from the year 2017 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,3, LMU Munich, language: English, abstract: This paper is structured into two parts – in the first part about race I first want to talk about some theories about Othello’s race, Elizabethan stereotypes about Moors and what might have been reasons for making Othello, the Moor of Venice. In the second part I am going to focus on the part religion plays in Othello, the opposition of Christianity against Islam, the influence religion, the bible and the other character’s religious affiliations play in Othello and of course Othello’s own religious denomination....






Othello A Racist Play


Othello A Racist Play

Author by : Anouk Anderson
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 2009-08-05
Publisher by : GRIN Verlag

ISBN :

Description : Seminar paper from the year 2009 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,0, University of Bremen, language: English, abstract: Othello already raised questions about the nature of race, its social implications and about the correlation of outer appearances and inner qualities. The matter of skin colour and racist stereotyping is evident in Othello and it is vital for the interpretation of the play. As an “extravagant and wheeling stranger/ Of here, and every where” (1.1.135-136). Othello is not just like any other man, but largely defined by his origin and colour. In this paper I want to examine the role of Othello's skin colour in the play and if we can consider the play as racist. Although these questions are today probably more relevant than ever, my main focus will be to analyse the importance of race in the context of Shakespeare's times. In order to answer the question, whether or not Othello is a racist drama, I first have to define the term 'race'. As the concept of race has changed over time and is still changing, I will also look at Elizabethan attitudes towards race and foreigners and how strangers were portrayed on the Elizabethan stage. The play is not set in England, but in Venice, a place that serves a certain function in the play, which I will also examine. In the second part of this paper I will look at the play itself and its characters. I will analyse the different roles and their attitudes towards Othello's colour and how they influence Othello's self-perception and his personal fate. In Othello skin colour and blackness stand for more than just physical appearance or cultural background, but it is also linked to the character's inner lives and it largely determines the outcome of the play. The importance of racial concepts in Othello will be examined in the last part of this paper....






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