Empathy

Book Review: Empathy

As I read through Empathy, a fascinating book co-authored by Amy Coplan and Peter Goldie, I found myself drawn into a rich exploration of the concept of empathy. This book is truly a masterpiece that provides thought-provoking analysis and insights on this subject.

The authors approach the topic of empathy not only from a philosophical perspective but also from psychological and neurological viewpoints. The book delves into the complexities of this fundamental aspect of human nature, exploring its implications in various aspects of our lives such as morality, education, politics, and social behavior.

One thing that struck me about the book is the authors’ skillful blend of theory with practical examples. They explain complex concepts clearly and present real-life scenarios that help to illustrate their points effectively. As I read through each chapter, I gained valuable insights that helped me understand more about different forms of empathy such as emotional contagion, cognitive empathy, and affective empathy.

Overall, Empathy is an excellent piece of literature that offers profound reflections on what it means to be empathetic. It is well-researched and superbly written; the authors’ use language effectively to make their point clear. The 382-page book requires some time investment to go through all its content fully.

If there were one criticism I’d have for this book, it would be that their theoretical approach can often feel dense at times. Nevertheless, despite this minor critique, Empathy remains an eminently readable yet scholarly work on one of mankind’s greatest traits.

In conclusion, if you’re searching for an engaging examination of what makes us human beings so uniquely capable of understanding fellow humans’ emotions – whether in personal or professional arenas – then Empathy should be at the top of your reading list!

See also  Critical Psychology

Empathy

Empathy

publishedDate : 2014

authors : Amy Coplan, Peter Goldie

publishers : Oxford University Press

pageCount : 382

Article Related to “Empathy” Book :

Empathy Definition & Meaning – Merriam-Webster

The meaning of EMPATHY is the action of understanding, being aware of, being sensitive to, and vicariously experiencing the feelings, thoughts, and experience of another; also : the capacity for this. How to use empathy in a sentence. Sympathy vs. Empathy What is the difference between empathy and compassion?

Empathy | Psychology Today

Empathy is the ability to recognize, understand, and share the thoughts and feelings of another person, animal, or fictional character. Developing empathy is crucial for establishing relationships …

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Empathy Emotional Ethical And Epistemological Narratives

Author by : Ricardo Gutiérrez Aguilar
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 2019-06-07
Publisher by : BRILL

ISBN :

Description : Empathy is sometimes a surprisingly evasive emotion. It is in appearance the emotion responsible for stitching together a shared experience with our common fellow. This volume looks for the common ground between the results of Digital Media ideas on the subject, fields like Nursing or Health and Social Care, Psychiatry, Psychology, and Philosophy, and finally even in Education, Literature and Dramatic Performance....






Empathy


Empathy

Author by : Susan Lanzoni
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 2018-09-25
Publisher by : Yale University Press

ISBN :

Description : A surprising, sweeping, and deeply researched history of empathy—from late-nineteenth-century German aesthetics to mirror neurons†‹ Empathy: A History tells the fascinating and largely unknown story of the first appearance of “empathy” in 1908 and tracks its shifting meanings over the following century. Despite empathy’s ubiquity today, few realize that it began as a translation of Einfühlung or “in-feeling” in German psychological aesthetics that described how spectators projected their own feelings and movements into objects of art and nature. Remarkably, this early conception of empathy transformed into its opposite over the ensuing decades. Social scientists and clinical psychologists refashioned empathy to require the deliberate putting aside of one’s feelings to more accurately understand another’s. By the end of World War II, interpersonal empathy entered the mainstream, appearing in advice columns, popular radio and TV, and later in public forums on civil rights. Even as neuroscientists continue to map the brain correlates of empathy, its many dimensions still elude strict scientific description. This meticulously researched book uncovers empathy’s historical layers, offering a rich portrait of the tension between the reach of one’s own imagination and the realities of others’ experiences....






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Empathy And The Novel

Author by : Suzanne Keen
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 2007-04-19
Publisher by : Oxford University Press

ISBN :

Description : Does empathy felt while reading fiction actually cultivate a sense of connection, leading to altruistic actions on behalf of real others? Empathy and the Novel presents a comprehensive account of the relationships among novel reading, empathy, and altruism. Drawing on psychology, narrative theory, neuroscience, literary history, philosophy, and recent scholarship in discourse processing, Keen brings together resources and challenges for the literary study of empathy and the psychological study of fiction reading. Empathy robustly enters into affective responses to fiction, yet its role in shaping the behavior of emotional readers has been debated for three centuries. Keen surveys these debates and illustrates the techniques that invite empathetic response. She argues that the perception of fictiveness increases the likelihood of readers' empathy in part by releasing them from the guarded responses necessitated by the demands of real others. Narrative empathy is a strategy and subject of contemporary novelists from around the world, writers who tacitly endorse the potential universality of human emotions when they call upon their readers' empathy. If narrative empathy is to be taken seriously, Keen suggests, then women's reading and responses to popular fiction occupy a central position in literary inquiry, and cognitive literary studies should extend its range beyond canonical novels. In short, Keen's study extends the playing field for literature practitioners, causing it to resemble more closely that wide open landscape inhabited by readers....






Against Empathy


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Author by : Paul Bloom
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 2016-12-06
Publisher by : HarperCollins

ISBN :

Description : New York Post Best Book of 2016 We often think of our capacity to experience the suffering of others as the ultimate source of goodness. Many of our wisest policy-makers, activists, scientists, and philosophers agree that the only problem with empathy is that we don’t have enough of it. Nothing could be farther from the truth, argues Yale researcher Paul Bloom. In AGAINST EMPATHY, Bloom reveals empathy to be one of the leading motivators of inequality and immorality in society. Far from helping us to improve the lives of others, empathy is a capricious and irrational emotion that appeals to our narrow prejudices. It muddles our judgment and, ironically, often leads to cruelty. We are at our best when we are smart enough not to rely on it, but to draw instead upon a more distanced compassion. Basing his argument on groundbreaking scientific findings, Bloom makes the case that some of the worst decisions made by individuals and nations—who to give money to, when to go to war, how to respond to climate change, and who to imprison—are too often motivated by honest, yet misplaced, emotions. With precision and wit, he demonstrates how empathy distorts our judgment in every aspect of our lives, from philanthropy and charity to the justice system; from medical care and education to parenting and marriage. Without empathy, Bloom insists, our decisions would be clearer, fairer, and—yes—ultimately more moral. Brilliantly argued, urgent and humane, AGAINST EMPATHY shows us that, when it comes to both major policy decisions and the choices we make in our everyday lives, limiting our impulse toward empathy is often the most compassionate choice we can make....






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Author by : Harvard Business Review
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 2017-04-18
Publisher by : Harvard Business Press

ISBN :

Description : Empathy is credited as a factor in improved relationships and even better product development. But while it’s easy to say “just put yourself in someone else’s shoes,” the reality is that understanding the motivations and emotions of others often proves elusive. This book helps you understand what empathy is, why it’s important, how to surmount the hurdles that make you less empathetic—and when too much empathy is just too much. This volume includes the work of: Daniel Goleman Annie McKee Adam Waytz This collection of articles includes “What Is Empathy?” by Daniel Goleman; “Why Compassion Is a Better Managerial Tactic Than Toughness” by Emma Seppala; “What Great Listeners Actually Do” by Jack Zenger and Joseph Folkman; “Empathy Is Key to a Great Meeting” by Annie McKee; “It’s Harder to Empathize with People If You’ve Been in Their Shoes” by Rachel Rutton, Mary-Hunter McDonnell, and Loran Nordgren; “Being Powerful Makes You Less Empathetic” by Lou Solomon; “A Process for Empathetic Product Design” by Jon Kolko; “How Facebook Uses Empathy to Keep User Data Safe” by Melissa Luu-Van; “The Limits of Empathy” by Adam Waytz; and “What the Dalai Lama Taught Daniel Goleman About Emotional Intelligence” an interview with Daniel Goleman by Andrea Ovans. How to be human at work. The HBR Emotional Intelligence Series features smart, essential reading on the human side of professional life from the pages of Harvard Business Review. Each book in the series offers proven research showing how our emotions impact our work lives, practical advice for managing difficult people and situations, and inspiring essays on what it means to tend to our emotional well-being at work. Uplifting and practical, these books describe the social skills that are critical for ambitious professionals to master....






A Rumor Of Empathy


A Rumor Of Empathy

Author by : L. Agosta
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 2014-11-11
Publisher by : Springer

ISBN :

Description : A rumor of empathy in vicarious receptivity, understanding, interpretation, narrative, and empathic intersubjectivity becomes the scandal of empathy in Lipps and Strachey. Yet when all the philosophical arguments and categories are complete and all the hermeneutic circles spun out, we are quite simply in the presence of another human being....






Empathy And Its Limits


Empathy And Its Limits

Author by : Aleida Assmann
Languange Used : en
Release Date : 2016-01-26
Publisher by : Springer

ISBN :

Description : This volume extends the theoretical scope of the important concept of empathy by analysing not only the cultural contexts that foster the generating of empathy, but in focusing also on the limits of pro-social feelings and the mechanisms that lead to its blocking....






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